National Drug Strategy
National Drug Strategy

British American Tobacco Australia - Response to the draft National Tobacco Strategy 2012-2018 - 25 June 2012

Strengthen social marketing campaigns to discourage uptake of smoking; motivate smokers to quit; prevent relapse; and reshape social norms about smoking;

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BATA supports media and social marketing campaigns designed to highlight the health risks associated with tobacco consumption and the health benefits associated with quitting for those who currently smoke. In this regard, we note the already significant commitment made to this by the Australian Government, including the commitment in 2010 to a four year, $85 million social marketing campaign.

That media and social marketing campaigns can be effective is widely accepted. In addition to the studies referred to in the draft NTS, BATA notes the conclusions of the UK Department of Health that:

“International evidence has demonstrated the effectiveness of mass media campaigns as a key strand of tobacco control strategy…

Public anti-smoking campaigns have been shown to be cost effective and most likely to succeed if designed according to social marketing theory, with sufficiently large, sustained campaigns and appropriately targeted messages based on empirical evidence for the intended population.”12

One additional area that the government could focus on in any new media campaign is that of the dangers posed by the growing threat of the illicit tobacco market. We outline in more detail below the seriousness of this problem in the priority area dealing with affordability. Given the seriousness of the threat posed by the illicit tobacco market, any comprehensive social marketing campaign addressing tobacco use, should also address the problem of illicit tobacco.

12 Department of Health publication: Excellence in Tobacco Control: 10 high impact changes to achieve tobacco control – An evidence-based resource for local Alliances. First published in May 2008.

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