National Drug Strategy
National Drug Strategy

Australian secondary school students' use of tobacco, alcohol, and over-the-counter and illicit substances in 2011

3.2 What brands of cigarettes do students smoke and how do they access them?

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Table 3.3 shows the most popular cigarette brands smoked among those who had smoked in the seven days prior to the survey. Students who indicated that they smoked multiple brands were excluded from these analyses.

Table 3.3: Usual brands smoked by those who smoked in the previous seven days†#, Australia, 2011

12 to 15 years

Brand
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Winfield
32.1
30.7
31.4
Peter Jackson
10.8
11.6
11.2
Longbeach
12.8
20.8
16.8
Horizon
18.0
11.6
14.9
Benson & Hedges
2.4
0.6
1.5
Holiday
2.2
4.6
3.4
Dunhill
1.0
1.5
1.3
Marlboro
7.0
7.3
7.2
Escort
1.5
2.0
1.8
Alpine
1.8
1.0
1.4

16 to 17 years

Brand
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Winfield
41.0
39.9
40.4
Peter Jackson
12.7
11.2
12.0
Longbeach
6.8
11.4
9.1
Horizon
4.0
5.3
4.6
Benson & Hedges
9.0
3.9
6.4
Holiday
1.1
4.9
3.0
Dunhill
4.2
2.1
3.1
Marlboro
6.6
6.5
6.5
Escort
0.8
1.3
1.0
Alpine
0.9
0.7
0.8

Total

Brand
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Winfield
37.2
36.0
36.6
Peter Jackson
11.9
11.4
11.7
Longbeach
9.3
15.3
12.3
Horizon
9.9
7.9
8.9
Benson & Hedges
6.2
2.5
4.4
Holiday
1.6
4.8
3.2
Dunhill
2.9
1.9
2.4
Marlboro
6.7
6.8
6.8
Escort
1.1
1.6
1.4
Alpine
1.3
0.8
1.0

† Percentages exclude responses from students who gave more than one brand.
# Percentages do not add to 100 as only the most frequent responses are listed.

In 2011, Winfield was the most popular cigarette brand smoked among current smokers (37%). Peter Jackson (12%) and Longbeach (12%) were the next most commonly smoked brands.
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In 2011, Winfield, Peter Jackson and Longbeach were all sold in packets of 20s and 25s.

Table 3.4 shows the size of the pack from which students commonly obtain their cigarettes.

Table 3.4: Percentage of current smokers# obtaining their last cigarette from different pack sizes, Australia, 2011

12 to 15 years

Pack size
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
20
41.9
34.0
38.2
25
32.1
28.9
30.6
30
12.9
16.7
14.7
35
0.6
2.3
1.4
40
5.7
8.7
7.1
50
6.7
9.4
8.0

16 to 17 years

Pack size
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
20
31.2
23.2
27.2
25
42.0
37.7
39.8
30
12.9
22.3
17.6
35
1.5
2.3
1.9
40
5.4
9.5
7.5
50
7.0
5.0
6.0

Total

Pack size
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
20
36.0
27.7
31.9
25
37.6
34.0
35.8
30
12.9
20.0
16.4
35
1.1
2.3
1.7
40
5.5
9.1
7.3
50
6.9
6.8
6.9

# Current smokers: students who smoked on any of the past seven days.
† Percentages exclude responses from students who gave more than one pack size.

Cigarettes were most commonly obtained from packets of 25 (36% of all current smokers), closely followed by packets of 20 (32%) and then by packs of 30 (16%).

Among 12- to 15-year-old current smokers, a slightly higher proportion of current smokers obtained cigarettes from packs of 20 (38%) rather than packs of 25s (31%). Among 16- to 17-year-old current smokers, fewer used packs of 20 (27%) than packs of 25 (40%). The proportion of 12- to 15-year-olds who obtained cigarettes from packs of 20 was significantly higher than among 16- to 17-year-olds (p<0.01).

Tables 3.5 and 3.6 show how current smokers accessed their last cigarettes in 2011.
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Table 3.5: Percentage of current smokers# who bought or did not buy their last cigarette, Australia, 2011

12 to 15 years
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Did not buy cigarettes
87.8
92.0
89.7
Bought cigarettes
12.2
8.0
10.3
16 to 17 years
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Did not buy cigarettes
73.0
81.6
77.3
Bought cigarettes
27.0
18.4
22.7
Total
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Did not buy cigarettes
79.4
85.7
82.5
Bought cigarettes
20.6
14.3
17.5

# Current smokers: students who smoked on any of the past seven days.

Most current smokers did not buy their last cigarette themselves. Eighteen per cent of all current smokers bought their last cigarette themselves (Table 3.5). Buying cigarettes was more common among 16- to 17-year-old current smokers (23%) than among those aged 12 to 15 years (10%) (p<0.01).

Table 3.6: Percentage of current smokers^ obtaining their last cigarette from different sources#, Australia, 2011

12 to 15 years

Did not buy cigarettes
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Parents
4.8
8.1
6.3
Siblings
2.9
5.5
4.1
Took from home
6.8
11.6
9.0
Friends
53.0
43.6
48.7
Someone bought it
16.1
21.6
18.6
Bought from
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Supermarket
1.7
1.7
1.7
Milk bar
2.0
2.1
2.0
Petrol station
1.2
0.4
0.8
Convenience store
1.8
1.7
1.7

16 to 17 years

Did not buy
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Parents
1.8
3.9
2.9
Siblings
1.1
3.1
2.1
Took from home
0.9
3.1
2.0
Friends
51.2
44.8
48.1
Someone bought it
16.3
24.6
20.4
Bought from
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Supermarket
4.2
2.4
3.3
Milk bar
3.1
3.3
3.2
Petrol station
4.0
2.0
3.0
Convenience store
4.7
3.9
4.3

Total

Did not buy
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Parents
3.2
5.6
4.3
Siblings
1.9
4.0
2.9
Took from home
3.5
6.5
4.9
Friends
52.0
44.4
48.3
Someone bought it
16.2
23.4
19.7
Bought from
Males (%)
Females (%)
Total (%)
Supermarket
3.1
2.1
2.6
Milk bar
2.6
2.8
2.7
Petrol station
2.7
1.4
2.1
Convenience store
3.7
3.0
3.2

^ Current smokers: students who smoked on any of the past seven days.
# Percentages do not add to 100 as only the most frequent responses are listed.

The two most common ways for adolescents to access cigarettes were through their friends (48% of all current smokers) and asking someone else to buy cigarettes for them (20% of all current smokers) (Table 3.6).

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