National Drug Strategy
National Drug Strategy

Australian secondary school students' use of tobacco, alcohol, and over-the-counter and illicit substances in 2011

List of Tables

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Table of contents

Table 2.1: Number of students surveyed in 2011 in Australia, by age and gender

Table 3.1: Lifetime experience and current cigarette smoking by secondary school students according to age and gender#,Australia, 2011

Table 3.2: Smoking behaviours of secondary school students who smoked in the week before the survey, by age and gender (base: current smokers), Australia, 2011

Table 3.3: Preferred brands smoked by those who smoked in the previous seven days^†#, Australia, 2011

Table 3.4: Percentage of current smokers# obtaining their last cigarette from different pack sizes, Australia, 2011

Table 3.5: Percentage of current smokers# who bought or did not buy their last cigarette, Australia, 2011

Table 3.6: Percentage of current smokers^ obtaining their last cigarette from different sources#, Australia, 2011

Table 3.7: Percentage of students at each age believing it would be easy or very easy for them to purchase cigarettes themselves or by getting someone else to buy cigarettes for them, Australia, 2011

Table 3.8: Percentage of students who are current smokers# or not in each age believing it would be easy or very easy for them to purchase cigarettes themselves or by getting someone else to buy cigarettes for them, Australia, 2011

Table 3.9: Self-description of smoking status by age and gender for all students surveyed in, Australia, 2011

Table 3.10: Percentage of students in each self-description of smoking status category indicating they had been smoking in each time period and average number of cigarettes smoked per week by current smokers in each group, Australia, 2011#

Table 3.11: Students’ intention to smoke in the next 12 months, Australia, 2011#

Table 3.12: Intention to smoke in the next 12 months among current smokers#, Australia, 2011

Table 3.13: Percentage of students involved with tobacco use at different levels in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 4.1: Lifetime experience and current use of alcohol by secondary school students according to age and gender, Australia, 2011^

Table 4.2: Alcohol consumption among current drinkers# by age and gender, Australia, 2011^Top of page

Table 4.3: Drink types most commonly consumed by current drinkers^†, Australia, 2011

Table 4.4: Most common sources of last alcoholic drink among current drinkers^# †, Australia, 2011

Table 4.5: Common sources of alcohol among current drinkers who had someone else buy alcohol for them#, Australia, 2011

Table 4.6: Most common locations of last alcoholic drink for current drinkers, Australia, 2011^†#

Table 4.7: Percentage of current drinkers who reported that an adult was supervising them when they consumed their last alcoholic drink#,Australia, 2011

Table 4.8: Percentage of current drinkers# drinking at home, at a party or at a friends’ house who consumed their last alcoholic drink under adult supervision, Australia, 2011

Table 4.9: Average number of drinks# consumed per week among younger (12- to 15-year-olds), older (16- to 17-year-olds) and all current drinkers^ by source of alcohol and where alcohol was consumed, Australia, 2011

Table 4.10: Self-description of drinking behaviour by age and gender for all Australian secondary school students, Australia, 2011

Table 4.11: Where current drinkers^ who describe themselves as ‘non-drinker’, ‘occasional drinker’ and ‘party drinker’ consume alcohol and how they obtained it, Australia, 2011#

Table 4.12: The main negative outcomes that current drinkers# have experienced after drinking alcohol in the past 12 months, Australia, 2011 (multiple responses allowed)

Table 4.13: Percentage of current drinkers# indicating different frequencies of intending to get drunk when they consume alcohol, Australia, 2011

Table 4.14: Proportion of students using alcohol in their lifetime, in the previous month, in the previous seven days and proportion of all drinkers and current drinkers who consumed more than four drinks on a single occasion in the past seven days in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia^

Table 4.15: Percentage of male and female current drinkers^ aged 12 to 15 years and 16 to 17 years most commonly consumed drink types in 2005, 2008 and 2011 (only data from students who indicated that they consumed one type of drink were included in analysis), Australia

Table 5.1: Analgesics: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using analgesics in each recency category, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.2: The main reasons for using the last analgesic among students using analgesics in the past year (multiple responses allowed), Australia, 2011*Top of page

Table 5.3: Most common sources of analgesics for those students who used analgesics in the past year, Australia, 2011*

Table 5.4: Percentage of students using analgesics in their lifetime, in the past month or in the past week in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.5: Tranquillisers: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using tranquillisers in each recency category, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.6: Common sources of tranquillisers among those students who used sedatives in the past year, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.7: Percentage of students using tranquillisers in their lifetime, in the past month or in the past week in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.8: Cannabis: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using cannabis in each recency category, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.9: Percentage of students using cannabis in their lifetime, in the past month or in the past week in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.10: Inhalants: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using inhalants in each recency category, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.11: Hallucinogens: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using hallucinogens in each recency category,Australia, 2011#

Table 5.12: Percentage of students using hallucinogens, in their lifetime and in the past month in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.13: Amphetamines: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using amphetamines in each recency category, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.14: Percentage of students using amphetamines in their lifetime and in the past month in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.15: Steroids: Percentage of students in each age and gender group reporting use of steroids without a doctor’s prescription in an attempt to improve sporting ability, increase muscle size or improve appearance, by age and gender, Australia, 2011# Top of page

Table 5.16: Opiates: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using opiates other than for medical reasons in each recency category, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.17: Percentage of students who had used opiates in their lifetime or in the past month in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.18: Cocaine: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using cocaine in each recency category, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.19: Percentage of students who had used cocaine in their life or in the past month in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.20: Ecstasy: Percentage of students in each age and gender grouping using ecstasy in each recency period, Australia, 2011#

Table 5.21: Percentage of students who had used ecstasy in their lifetime or in the past month in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.22: Percentage of students who had used any illicit substance or any illicit substance excluding cannabis, in their lifetime or in the past month in 2005, 2008 and 2011, Australia

Table 5.23: Percentage of students who had used tranquilisers, cannabis, amphetamines, hallucinogens or ecstasy in the past 12 months indicating they had used other substances on the same occasion, Australia, 2011

Table 7.1: Percentage of students indicating they had received more than one lesson about the use of illicit substances in the previous school year, Australia 2011

Table 3A.1: Number of 12 to 17 year old full-time students enrolled in Australian secondary schools by age, gender and education sector, 2011#

Table 4A.1: 95% Confidence intervals for sample sizes achieved in ASSAD 2011 for male and females in each age group for proportions: 90%/10%; 80%/20%; 70%/30%; 60%/40%; 50%/50%. Top of page

Table 5A.1: Percentage of students surveyed indicating they had ever used each of the different substances asked about in the survey in 2011 and 2008 in three age groups (12–13-year-olds; 14–15-year-olds and 16–17-year-olds)

Table 5A.2: Percentage of students surveyed indicating that in the past month they had used each of the different substances asked about in the survey in 2011 and 2008 in three age groups (12–13-year-olds; 14–15-year-olds and 16–17-year-olds)

Table 6A.1: Proportion of students drinking alcohol at a level that puts them at risk of short term harm (2001 drinking guidelines) by age and sex, Australia

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